Let’s Take A Trip On The Mulhouse TramTrain

Real TramTrain in action in Mulhouse France.

Let’s go for a ride.

https://youtu.be/46Fo7qCcyW0

 

Comments

5 Responses to “Let’s Take A Trip On The Mulhouse TramTrain”
  1. Paxton Cheung says:

    Interesting…Mulhouse is where ALCATEL was originally based; they further developed the SELTRAC system used by the Vancouver SkyTrain. Mulhouse is indeed the birthplace of great mass transit!

    Zwei replies: You confuse signalling with mass transit. Wrong. SELTRAC was originally envisioned to reduce the cost of signalling, while at the same time increase capacity. The SEL, stands for Standard Electric Lorenz, which marketed the SELTRAC ATC and was only successful only on the heaviest used metro routes.

  2. Chris Peters says:

    Zwei replies: You confuse signalling with mass transit. Wrong. SELTRAC was originally envisioned to reduce the cost of signalling, while at the same time increase capacity. The SEL, stands for Standard Electric Lorenz, which marketed the SELTRAC ATC and was only successful only on the heaviest used metro routes.

    ***

    You seem to take a really combative approach with a lot of posters.

    You have had this website up for a long time and doubtless put many hundreds or thousands of hours into it.

    Despite that, you have had, apparently, zero impact on the decision making of the relevant decision makers. It is almost as if they simply do not care what you think, or have to say.

    Have you ever thought about spending your time doing something else?

  3. Chris Peters says:

    Perhaps I have not been clear.

    By now you surely must realize that public transportation planning and construction in the “Lower Mainland” of British Columbia has been, and continues to be, fully independent of your views. This despite your website and the occasional “open letter” to important people in British Columbia.

    Your opinions are many, but always unsolicited.

    One would think that a reasonable person, in your position, would ask him or herself whether continuing on in like manner is a good use of their time.

    Yet you continue on, seemingly unbothered.

    Why?

    Zwei replies: Fact is I follow he views of professionals, which TransLink does not. Your irrational views are noted. If you don’t like what you read, why bother?

  4. Chris Peters says:

    To further my point:

    Your website reads almost like a “hate site” against the SkyTrain. It is in some ways analogous to far-right or “hate” sights where human group “ABC” is maligned and degraded and human group “XYZ” is preferred and glorified.

    The difference though, is that the hate site owners can always point to some degree of support. It may not be intelligent support; it may not be respectable support. But it is support and unfortunately, some times, it is significant support.

    You, on the other hand, cannot point to any traction amongst people who influence mass transit decisions in any meaningful way. Yes, there are doubtless some who feel as you do, but their opinions don’t have any influence in public life.

    Which brings up the question, “What do you do with your time?”

    Zwei replies: I as the questions that no one has bothers to ask and those who run the show seem afraid to answer.

    So called rapid transit has been built by political diktat, not sound planning. The Canada line is a good example of this nonsense.

  5. Haveacow says:

    Chris Peters, don’t confuse Zwei’s sometimes over use of the I hate Skytrain comments with hate of transit professionals in BC in general. I understand Zwei’s zealousness regarding Skytrain. I live in Ottawa and I am a professional planner there. I was part of a large group of people and organizations that helped to finally bring rail based transit to Ottawa with the O-Train (now the O-Train Trillium Line). We had to fight an entrenched opposition solidly behind our Transitway System (A network of physically segregated busways, with sections of grade separated busway rights of way like the majority of your Skytrain Rights of Way and painted bus lanes). Many entire professional careers in our city had been entirely based on our successful model of transit operations. Unfortunately it wasn’t working very well anymore.

    Whenever a change in operational technology was suggested it was officially shot down and ridiculed by a ready army of BRT only transit believers both in public and online. Many are still there trashing the current conversion of the Central Transitway to LRT. No rapid transit operating technology is perfect. A smart mixture of technologies is always best, especially when geographic scale or especially dogged capacity and operational cost problems are evident. Skytrain has got these issues in spades. It has done a fairly good job but it is running up to its operational limits and unless a tremendous amount of money is spent to upgrade it Skytrain will continue to have escalating operational and cost related problems.

    Is Zwei right all the time, no! That meaness and crassness he shows is the result of having to fight years of broken promises and outright abuse by suggesting anything other than Skytrain, as the transit operational technology answer. But sometimes you need that small number of loud critics like Zwei, to show when you have a problem. Zwei is offering a technological answer in the form of the Tram-Train concept and cheaper LRT operations or lightweight DMU or EMU vehicles operating on mainline railways or some combination of these (like Ottawa’s original, very cheap to build and operate O-Train line). Much of what Zwei is showing you has a real chance of doing the same job as Skytrain, at cheaper costs. Especially in lesser passenger dense areas which are driving the costs of operating your system higher and higher. I use to work for Bombardier, the Skytrain Technology or the INNOVIA 300 Automated Light Metro System is not doing well. Financially or operationally. Bombardier now has to sub-contract most of the Skytrain’s parts because it is not compatible with Bombardier’s other high selling products like their Movia Metro product lines and Flexity Family of LRV’s. It’s becoming too costly for them to produce most of the Skytrain’s drive system themselves.