The Bergen Line

The Bergen Line

The Bergen Line

The Bergen Line or the Bergen Railway (Norwegian: Bergensbanen or Nynorsk: Bergensbana), is a 371-kilometre (231 mi) long scenic standard gauge railway line between Bergen and Hønefoss, Norway. The name is often applied for the entire route from Bergen via Drammen to Oslo, where the passenger trains go, a distance of 496 kilometres (308 mi). It is the highest mainline railway line in Northern Europe, crossing the Hardangervidda plateau at 1,237 metres (4,058 ft) above sea level.

The railway opened from Bergen to Voss in 1883 as the narrow gauge Voss Line. In 1909 the route was continued over the mountain to Oslo and the whole route converted to standard gauge, and the Voss Line became part of the Bergen Line. The line is single track, and was electrified in 1954–64. The Bergen Line is owned and maintained by Bane NOR, and served with passenger trains by Vy Tog and freight trains by CargoNet. The Flåm Line remains as the only branch line, after the closure of the Hardanger Line. The western section from Bergen to Voss is also served by the Bergen Commuter Rail, and was shortened following the 1966 opening of the Ulriken Tunnel.

The Bergen line.

The Bergen line.

The scenery is spectacular and this video is worth a watch.

Please cut and paste.

https://youtu.be/JvDjZRR9LAg?si=eltgP3OpvHKV-QQA

Comments

One Response to “The Bergen Line”
  1. Major Hoople says:

    I have worked on the Bergen Line and it is a start and foreboding place.

    We worked on increasing the headway’s on the line so that more passenger services and longer freight trains could be operated.

    the Flam Line is an absolute wonder with 5.5% gradients fo over 10 km!

    The stiff grades on the Bergen Line sees double headed operation by very powerful electric locomotives and the EMU’s used have larger and more powerful motors to deal with the harsh gradients.

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