A Letter in the Sun

Strange that, after the resounding NO vote in the recent plebiscite, the Vancouver Sun has been giving ink to some very pro LRT writers, in both the Op-Ed section and the Letters To The Editor Section.

Saturday, July 18: Portland LRT grounded in reality

Vancouver Sun July 17, 2015
Letter writer Ray Arnold’s decision to vote No in our recent transit plebiscite was due in part to his transit experiences in Portland (pictured), Seattle, and San Francisco, where, he says, ground-level light rail has proven to be immensely cheaper and equally, if not more, efficient than subways, more effective in building community cohesion, and less detrimental to traffic control and business than our so-called experts claim would be the case here.

Photograph by: Handout Ric Ernst, PNG

One of the fun things about visiting Portland is how easy it is to navigate around the city on the light rail transit system.

No walking up and down stairs or riding elevators or escalators to elevated or underground stations. Simply wait at a street-level transit stop and step on board.

While on board, you can check out the neighbourhoods you are passing through or hop off to visit an interesting store or restaurant you just passed. It’s a more civilized and enjoyable experience than riding the Canada Line and at a cost of $40 million per km to build compared with subways at $250 million per km, it’s clear Portland’s politicians and administrators have made more enlightened and responsible decisions for their taxpayers than ours have and were going to make for us.

My decision to vote No in our recent referendum was due in part to the transit experiences I have had in Portland, Seattle, and San Francisco, where ground level light rail has proven to be immensely cheaper and equally, if not more, efficient than subways, more effective in building community cohesion, and less detrimental to traffic control and business than our so-called experts claim would be the case here.

Congratulations No voters — you recognized incompetence at work and responded accordingly.

Ray Arnold, Richmond

 

Portland MAX LRT

Fact file

2½-Hour Ticket 1-Day Pass 7-Day Pass 14-Day Pass 30-Day/
1-Month Pass †
1-Year Pass ‡
Adult $2.50 $5 $26 $51 $100 $1,100
Honored Citizen
(ages 65+/disabled/medicare)
$1 $2 $7 $13.50 $26 $286
Youth
(ages 7–17 or high school/GED students)
$1.25 $2.50 $7.50 $14.50 $28 $308
Children
(ages 0–7)
Free when accompanied by fare-paying passenger
Notes:

  • † 30-day passes are sold at ticket vending machines at MAX stations, while passes valid for a single calendar month are sold at TriMet ticket outlets.
  • ‡ 1-year pass can only be purchased at TriMet’s Pioneer Square office.

 

Locale Portland metropolitan area, Oregon
Transit type Light rail
Number of lines 4
Number of stations 87
Daily ridership 118,400 (avg. weekday boardings, FY2014)
Annual ridership 38.23 million (boardings, FY2014)
Website MAX Light Rail
Operation
Began operation September 5, 1986
Operator(s) TriMet
Number of vehicles 127
Technical
System length 52 mi (83.7 km)
Track gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
(standard gauge

Comments

One Response to “A Letter in the Sun”
  1. Rico says:

    The Charlotte streetcar opened.